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DELHI HOTELS
WHERE TO STAY AND WHICH ROOMS TO BOOK
Considering it's the capital of one of the world's largest countries, Delhi is dismally short on decent hotels. Of the 155 or so listed in the tourism brochures, only a handful are worthy of consideration and fewer still are in good condition. As a result, finding a room can be an exercise in frustration. Hotels like The Imperial and The Oberoi are regularly block-booked by tour groups, so it's best to plan as far ahead as possible, and even then don't assume that you will get the room you want.

The logical solution would be to build more hotels, but given the exorbitant land prices, height restrictions and stringent zoning laws, most new ventures have been forced out to Delhi's fringes, especially the satellite city of Gurgaon in the neighbouring state of Haryana, The sole exception is a new Amanresort currently under construction off Lodi Road. A 6o-room boutique property with all Aman's signature flourishes, it's due for completion by 2009-20IO. At the moment, Gurgaon is too far out to be convenient for most visitors, especially when ferocious traffic jams routinely turn the trip into Delhi into a gruelling hour-and-a-half slog. That said, once the new underground system comes into play in 2010, the journey will be more manageable. By then, a Four Seasons should be open, but should you opt for Gurgaon meanwhile, the opulent Trident Hilton is definitely the best bet.

India Gate
Adding a pinch of Paris to New Delhi, India Gate stands at the eastern end of the Rajpath, which leads to Rashtrapati Bhavan, the building originally intended to house pari iament. Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and finished in 1921, the 42m-high freestanding arch, which is dramatically lit at night, began life with the less snappy name of the All-India War Memorial. It was built to commemorate the 90,000 Indian soldiers who died in WWI, and their names are etched along the walls of the arch.
In 1971, India added its own touch with the installation of an eternal flame to honour Amar Jawan, the Immortal Soldier. Behind the gate is a sandstone chatri, a canopied stand, which originally housed a statue of King George V_ It was removed in 1968, and today the chatri stands empty. Rajpath

A white horseshoe- shaped post·deco box wrapped around a manicured lawn, The Claridges (no relation to the London hotel) could not be better located. A sprawling property, built wing by wing, it was one of the grandest addresses in town during its heyday, with maharajas on its guest list. The decor, as in the lobby, falls somewhere between colonial charm and 1950s farmhouse but, as with many of Delhi's top-end hotels, it is in the midst of a renovation. Like The Imperial, The Claridges went through a dark period, recovering only after an initial makeover in 2002. The aim, ultimately, is to transform it into a boutique hotel with a contemporary feel - in the meantime, book yourself into one of the Deluxe Rooms. 12 Aurangzeb Road, TOll 41335133, www.claridges·hotels.com

Years of piecemeal renovation have left The Oberoi without a uniform identity. The asymmetrical pool could be Palm Springs circa 1960: the lobby, with its black marble and gold detailing, is more LA 1980s; and the rest of the building is caught at various points between the 1960s and the modern day. Having settled on a contemporary aesthetic - epitomised by the spectacular Virgile and Stone-designed spa (see p094) and restaurants ThreesixlY' (see p039) and Travertino (see p042) - The Oberoi is now undergoing an overhaul. The 334 sq m Kohinoor Suite (left) is delightful, but many of the rooms have not yet been tackled and look frumpy. Oon't let this put you off: the staff are impeccably polite, tile service is seamless and each room has a view, over Delhi Golf Club or Humayun's Tomb. The Oberoi is the very best of the chain hotels. Dr Zakir Hussain Marg, TOll 2436 3030, www.oberoidelhi.com

Maidens Hotel

Maidens Hotel
For a long time, the Maidens was Delhi's only western-style hotel of repute. and it is practically the only one worth considering this far to the north. Former guests include Lutyens, who stayed here when he came to design the capital. Today, it has fallen on hard times; despite its purchase by The Oberoi group, it's not of the same standard as its sister property (see p020). although renovations are underway. Rooms, such as (he Luxury Suite (above), can feel rather cold, an impression heightened by the soaring ceilings. From the outside, though. it remains magnificent. a Georgian mansion overlooking the Red Fort (see p034) and the Jama Masjid (see p014). Atmospheric in that crumbling ghosts-of-the-Raj way India does so well, Maidens is perfect for a day or two if you want to see the old city. 7 Sham Nath Marg, Tall 23975464

The Park
With hot pink and powder-blue furniture, mood lighting, beaded curtain walls and Sanskrit characters carved into the walls of the corridors - the decor is courtesy of London's tonran & Partners - The Park is the city's foremost design hotel. It has also become a favourite watering hole of Oelhi's bright young things, who come to flirt and make merry in the dramatic bar or to lounge after a buffet lunch on the deck around the small but perfectly formed pool. Equally bijou is the hotel's revamped spa. The rooms are well appointed with all mod cons, and the suites on The Residence floors, such as the Presidential (above), have their own sitting room (overleaf) and access to a business centre and club area. The hotel's vibe is playful; naughty but nice. 15 Parliament Street. Tall 2374 3000, newdelhi.theparkhote/s.com


The Imperial
Set in acres of gardens right in the heart of the city, this gorgeous example of early colonial modernism, with its jasmine­scented halls and its opulent interiors, is hands down the best hotel in town. After a rough patch in the 1980s, when it briefly became a backpackers' hostel, The Imperial has recovered spectacularly. In 2002, it was given an overhaul, the potted palms and Persian rug aesthetic subtly updated with the addition of massive flower sculptures and modern amenities like wi-fi. with the exception of the 195 sq m Royal Imperial Suite (right), which comes with a jacuzzi and a steam room, a study and a butler's pantry, rooms are a little snug, but they do come with a walk­in closet. Reserve one facing the gardens (150 has a great view of the pool) and indulge your Passage to Indiafantasies. Janpath, Tall 2334 1234, theimperialindia.com

The Imperial
Set in acres of gardens right in the heart of the city, this gorgeous example of early colonial modernism, with its jasmine­scented halls and its opulent interiors, is hands down the best hotel in town. After a rough patch in the 1980s, when it briefly became a backpackers' hostel, The Imperial has recovered spectacularly. In 2002, it was given an overhaul, the potted palms and Persian rug aesthetic subtly updated with the addition of massive flower sculptures and modern amenities like wi-fi. with the exception of the 195
sq m Royal Imperial Suite (right), which comes with a jacuzzi and a steam room, a study and a butler's pantry, rooms are
a little snug, but they do come with a walk­in closet. Reserve one facing the gardens (150 has a great view of the pool) and indulge your Passage to Indiafantasies. Janpath, Tall 2334 1234, theimperialindia.com

Trident Hilton
Though it is awkwardly located for those interested in Delhi's historical sights, the Trident lies at the centre of one of the capital's most rapidly expanding satellite zones. From the imposing entrance, with its water features and burning braziers, to the tasteful and well-appointed rooms, such as the Deluxe (right), and its enticing pool (above), the Trident is an oasis of tranquillity in the chaos that is Gurgaon. As famous, at the moment, for its traffic jams and the clouds of dust kicked up by work on the new metro, road expansions and a building frenzy that makes Dubai look anaemic, Gurgaon is home to Delhi's IT and media industries and an increasing proportion of its more upwardly mobile citizens. The new malls, multiplexes and bars and restaurants attract huge crowds of non· residents, especially at weekends. 443 Udyog Vihar, Gurgaon, T 012 4245 0505, www.trident·hilton.com

24 HOURS
SEE THE BEST OF THE CITY IN JUST ONE DAY
Make the most of your day in Delhi by starting early; as traffic snarls can add hours to even short journeys. Then there is the weather. Summers - late March until the end of November, with the monsoon in the middle - are intense. By tram, the mercury will have already hit 40°C, so you won't want to be outside.

Begin at about Barn with a stroll along the river through the park at Ra· Ghat. From there, head north, skirting the old city walls, to Maidens Hotel for breakfast on the lawn. Suitably fortified, plunge back into the chaos of crumbling Old Delhi and spend a few hours at the Red Fort, the most beautiful Moghul building after the Taj Mahal. Exit via Chandni Chowk and then walk or take a cab to Connaught Place.

Pause for lunch at Veda, and afterwards, if you don't fancy doing as the locals do and taking an afternoon nap, try the refurbished 1930S Rivoli Cinema (Baba Kharak Singh Marg, T on 4150 2782) for a Bollywood matinee or The Imperial for afternoon tea in the jasmine-scented Atrium.

Next, visit the Nature Morte gallery (see P038), to discover work by the rising stars of India's art scene, before heading to Nizamuddin as the sun sets for a stroll through the gardens at Humayun's Tomb (Mathura Road). End your day with a cocktail and dinner at The Oberoi's ultra-modem Threesixty".